Radio Recap: Sat Nam! Songs for Khalsa Youth Camp & Snatam Kaur

Kathryn E. Livingston

Click here to listen to this episode of Spirit Voyage Radio!

Airdate: July 25, 2013

Prolific and enchanting sacred chant artist Snatam Kaur joins Ramdesh on this fun-loving podcast to discuss her new children’s CD Sat Nam! Songs from Khalsa Youth Camp. Gather the family and tune in—there’s something here for every age group (including the grown-ups).

Snatam recalls her days as a camper at Khalsa Youth Camp in New Mexico when she was a child (she now is a staff member there). When she became a mother, Snatam says, she wanted her daughter to have the same wonderful experiences. On this CD, a benefit album for the camp, Snatam teams up with camp director Siri Nam Singh, who has made music a vital part of the camp program.

In addition to including songs that are regularly sung at the camp, Snatam decided to put out a call to the worldwide Spirit Voyage family for submissions. Three of the 120 responses received are on this album, and they are wonderful. “All the Colors of the Rainbow,” the first track on this podcast and on the CD, was submitted by a father (Christopher Oscar) and son who made up the song to help entertain baby sister on the changing table. You’ll enjoy this sweet and uplifting track . “It’s super cute!” says Snatam.

Next up is a traditional Khalsa Youth Camp song, “Oh Guru Ram Das.” Snatam tells a fascinating story about how the smoke cleared above the children’s cabins after chanting to Guru Ram Das one summer when wildfires were raging in New Mexico. “The song has been around forever in the 3ho community, and I grew up with it,” Snatam says, so she knew she wanted to include it in the mix. Adds Ramdesh, Guru Ram Das is “a loving being of light, the lord of miracles and is a great energy to call on at any time.”

“Share It All” comes next, a song that was submitted by Michael Dinesh from the UK.  This is a rockin’ track about sharing that will make you want to sing and dance along. The children loved the selection so much that they “completely mastered the song and learned all the words.” They sound fab!

What is the secret to raising a conscious child? Leading by example is essential, Snatam believes. Little ones love to copy so it’s very effective to model the action yourself rather than explain to a child what they should be doing. (Her daughter is “four and three quarters!”) Becoming a parent, says Snatam, “is a great learning opportunity and it inspires you to become a better person on every level….” It’s also important to take the time to listen; kids have their own time and space which should be respected. It’s common to be busy in our culture but it’s important not to over-schedule kids; they need time just to be in their own flow, Snatam points out.

“I’d Rather Be Me” comes next; this cheerful melody ties in perfectly. Giving kids a chance to be themselves is so important. The first line is “I’d rather be me than watch TV; I think I’ll go and hug a tree!” Snatam shares how she and her husband decided to take TV totally out of their lives; this has had a positive impact on their whole family.

“The Five Tattvas” is next, a song that teaches kids about Earth, Air, Fire, Water, and Ether in a fun way (without lecturing!). You’ll also hear “Ask Your Intuition,” a song that was created by Siri Nam Singh and New Age artist WAH! This awesome song will help children tune into their own voice and develop the courage to follow their inner knowledge.

The podcast plays out to “Standing Like a Tree,” a beautiful track about being centered, grounded and living with an open heart. Round up your kids, wake up your own inner child, and get ready to rock, dance, and sing to “Sat Nam! Songs from Khalsa Youth Camp!” Help support this wonderful camp; find out more at 3ho.org.

 

 

 

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