Chef’s Corner: Turmeric Curry Recipe

turmericAs I sit in my house in Costa Rica and watch the vibrant sphere of light and energy bask over the country, its not hard for my thoughts to continue on around turmeric.  Turmeric has an incredible healing properties, and as our beloved teacher Yogi Bhajan use to mention, it’s a cure all for almost every disease.  It’s a significant root to use in dealing with building the immune system, and maintaining a healthy digestive system.  I never cease to be amazed by its significance.  Turmeric is a beautiful root to use in cooking, it’s a common ingredient in Indian cuisine, and has the distinctive flavors often associated with the east.  Turmeric truly can take us on a magical mystery tour, and who doesn’t want to ride on a magic carpet every now and then?

My friend Daniel has created a turmeric elixir business is in New York, that integrated the healing properties of the root, along with manifesting a delicious beverage, here is Daniels website that is lots of fun to look at, and packed with great information, enjoy. www.tumericalive.com/

Recipe: Basic Turmeric Curry

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil or ghee (clarified butter)
  • 1 medium onion – finely chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic – peeled and sliced
  • 1.5 inch piece root ginger – peeled and thinly sliced (it should look about the same volume as the garlic)
  • (Optional) 2 mild fleshy green chilies – de-seeded and veined then chopped
  • Half teaspoon turmeric powder
  • Half teaspoon ground cumin seed
  • Half teaspoon ground coriander seed
  • 5 tablespoons plain passata (smooth, thick, sieved tomatoes, US = purée) or 1 tablespoon concentrated tomato purée (US = paste) mixed with 4 tablespoons water

Method

  1. Heat the oil in a heavy pan then add the chopped onion and stir for a few minutes with the heat on high.
  2. Add the ginger, garlic and green chili (if using). Stir for 30 seconds then put the heat down to very low.
  3. Cook for 15 minutes stirring from time to time making sure nothing browns or burns.
  4. Add the turmeric, cumin and coriander and cook, still very gently, for a further 5 minutes. Don’t burn the spices or the sauce will taste horrid – sprinkle on a few drops of water if you’re worried.
  5. Take off the heat and cool a little. Put 4 fl oz cold water in a blender, add the contents of the pan and whizz until very smooth. Add the passata and stir.
  6. Put the puréed mixture back into the pan and cook for 20 – 30 minutes (the longer the better) over very low heat stirring occasionally. You can add a little hot water if it starts to catch on the pan but the idea is to gently “fry” the sauce which will darken in colour to an orangy brown. The final texture should be something like good tomato ketchup. Warning – it WILL gloop occasionally and splatter over your cooker, it’s the price you have to pay!
 

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